Jay Maisel

    
 
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}      In a postwar public high school near Coney Island, with no funding and no help, Mr. Friend (he was always Mr. Friend) formed a community of art students.    He started the “Art Squad.” It was, in the best sense of the word, an elite group.  If you were hard-working and stood out in your art classes, you might be lucky enough to be asked to join. That gave you further impetus to climb over an eight-foot-high   spiked steel fence in order to get into the school at 7:00 a.m., and do it again at 7:00 p.m.    What motivated all this? Mr. Friend taught by stretching not just your knowledge, but your expectations, your standards of excellence, and you.    He changed my life more than anyone I’ve known. He opened my eyes. He made me understand that work could be joy. He demanded your best. He respected you. He called everyone Mr. or Miss.    I know I speak for all of us who knew him when I say: Thank you, Mr. Friend.      - Jay Maisel, Brooklyn, NY    www.jaymaisel.com

In a postwar public high school near Coney Island, with no funding and no help, Mr. Friend (he was always Mr. Friend) formed a community of art students.

He started the “Art Squad.” It was, in the best sense of the word, an elite group.  If you were hard-working and stood out in your art classes, you might be lucky enough to be asked to join. That gave you further impetus to climb over an eight-foot-high spiked steel fence in order to get into the school at 7:00 a.m., and do it again at 7:00 p.m.

What motivated all this? Mr. Friend taught by stretching not just your knowledge, but your expectations, your standards of excellence, and you.

He changed my life more than anyone I’ve known. He opened my eyes. He made me understand that work could be joy. He demanded your best. He respected you. He called everyone Mr. or Miss.

I know I speak for all of us who knew him when I say: Thank you, Mr. Friend. 

- Jay Maisel, Brooklyn, NY

www.jaymaisel.com


Seth Resnick

   Photography allows me to communicate more effectively and more intimately. It is through photography that I feel a sixth sense.  My images become a journey into the personal space of my subject.    When I am shooting I feel I am exploring fantasy of nature. The images that work the best for me explore feelings of sensuality and create illusions but at the same time emphasize our fragile environment and instill a sense of responsibility to preserve it from further destruction.      - Seth Resnick     www.sethresnick.com

Photography allows me to communicate more effectively and more intimately. It is through photography that I feel a sixth sense.  My images become a journey into the personal space of my subject. 
When I am shooting I feel I am exploring fantasy of nature. The images that work the best for me explore feelings of sensuality and create illusions but at the same time emphasize our fragile environment and instill a sense of responsibility to preserve it from further destruction.

- Seth Resnick

www.sethresnick.com


Eric Meola

    
 
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}      Photography is in my blood--it always has been.  It's my way of keeping vibrant and exploring the world around me.  My passion for photography is constantly changing as I make new images and as my way of seeing evolves. It's my reason for being--my life, my way of saying 'here I am, this is what I see and how I see it.'      - Eric Meola    www.ericmeola.photography

Photography is in my blood--it always has been.  It's my way of keeping vibrant and exploring the world around me.  My passion for photography is constantly changing as I make new images and as my way of seeing evolves. It's my reason for being--my life, my way of saying 'here I am, this is what I see and how I see it.'  

- Eric Meola

www.ericmeola.photography


Aimee Dilger

  As a child I think I liked being in control of that small frame of space. I was never one for art photography but when I started going into the world of news photography in college I fell in love. It is very much a split right down the middle being a creative form of storytelling. I love news and telling other people's stories.  Photography is so important personally because it is a way to hold on to memories and relive past moments. As a photojournalist photography is of even greater importance, I am documenting history every day. I'm doing a service to my community by telling the truth and bringing that to our readers.  Aimee Dilger, Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, Pa   www.aimeedilger.photoshelter.com

As a child I think I liked being in control of that small frame of space. I was never one for art photography but when I started going into the world of news photography in college I fell in love. It is very much a split right down the middle being a creative form of storytelling. I love news and telling other people's stories.

Photography is so important personally because it is a way to hold on to memories and relive past moments. As a photojournalist photography is of even greater importance, I am documenting history every day. I'm doing a service to my community by telling the truth and bringing that to our readers.

Aimee Dilger, Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, Pa

www.aimeedilger.photoshelter.com


Ian Tuttle

    
 
       
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}      I love how a camera helps me meet people and helps me connect. It’s like a hall pass into all sorts of places and situations I wouldn’t otherwise experience.  I especially like creating photographs that make the viewer wonder how and where and why they were created… photos that make you ask questions!    Every person on earth has her or his own view of the world.  Even if we all witness the same exact thing, we will experience it differently.  I’m more interested in the person who took a photograph and the chain of events that lead to that one particular moment being captured… how did they come to this vantage point to get this particular photo? How did they get permission to photograph this person, in this situation?  Why did they decide to make this picture, and not another one? Underserved high school students…  By telling his or her own story from that very individual place, a student is saying “I exist, and this is who I am, and this is how I experience the world.” It’s opening up a new channel of communication.  It’s allowing the student to say, “I exist. Welcome to my world.”     Ian Tuttle,  San Francisco, Ca   www.ituttle.com

I love how a camera helps me meet people and helps me connect. It’s like a hall pass into all sorts of places and situations I wouldn’t otherwise experience.  I especially like creating photographs that make the viewer wonder how and where and why they were created… photos that make you ask questions!

Every person on earth has her or his own view of the world.  Even if we all witness the same exact thing, we will experience it differently.  I’m more interested in the person who took a photograph and the chain of events that lead to that one particular moment being captured… how did they come to this vantage point to get this particular photo? How did they get permission to photograph this person, in this situation?  Why did they decide to make this picture, and not another one? Underserved high school students…  By telling his or her own story from that very individual place, a student is saying “I exist, and this is who I am, and this is how I experience the world.” It’s opening up a new channel of communication.  It’s allowing the student to say, “I exist. Welcome to my world.” 

Ian Tuttle,  San Francisco, Ca

www.ituttle.com


Joanna McCarthy

    
 
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}      Photography has opened my eyes to the world more. I’ve always loved examining things even as a young girl, so I was not surprised when I became a photographer after a 20 year career as a model. I love the graphic and emotional senses coming together for me during my taking photographs.     I think being a photographer is like being a kid forever.     - Joanna McCarthy, Sagaponack, NY    www.joannamccarthy.com    

Photography has opened my eyes to the world more. I’ve always loved examining things even as a young girl, so I was not surprised when I became a photographer after a 20 year career as a model. I love the graphic and emotional senses coming together for me during my taking photographs. 

I think being a photographer is like being a kid forever.

- Joanna McCarthy, Sagaponack, NY

www.joannamccarthy.com